[Event] National Poetry Month 2015

Apparently, April is the month to celebrate poetry.

I vividly remember having to memorize “Jonathan Bing” and “The Owl and the Pussy-Cat” for declamation contests during my preschool days.  I’ve written and read a bit of poetry over the years, but I kinda have a love-hate relationship with it. Sort of. I very much dislike being forced to read and write and analyze poetry for English classes. But, I do have several poems that I really like.

One of my favorites is “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe. When I first read it years ago, it somewhat reminded me of a late loved one . . . And it reminds me of that person still every time I read it. It goes like this:

Continue reading

Advertisements

[Book Review] Coraline

Coraline_Audio_coverTitle: Coraline
Author: Neil Gaiman
Genre: Fantasy, Horror
Published: 2002
Recommended for ages 8 to 12 and up
Source: Borrowed from a friend
Audiobook: Narrated by Neil Gaiman

WHAT’S THE BOOK ABOUT?

Here’s a description from the author’s website:

When Coraline steps through a door to find another house strangely similar to her own (only better), things seem marvelous.

But there’s another mother there, and another father, and they want her to stay and be their little girl. They want to change her and never let her go.

Coraline will have to fight with all her wits and courage if she is to save herself and return to her ordinary life.

Continue reading

[Book Review] Mansfield Park

mansfield_park_coverTitle: Mansfield Park
Author: Jane Austen
Genre: Classics
Published: 1814
Source: Purchased

WHAT’S THE BOOK ABOUT?

From Goodreads:

Taken from the poverty of her parents’ home, Fanny Price is brought up with her rich cousins at Mansfield Park, acutely aware of her humble rank and with only her cousin Edmund as an ally. When Fanny’s uncle is absent in Antigua, Mary Crawford and her brother Henry arrive in the neighbourhood, bringing with them London glamour and a reckless taste for flirtation. As her female cousins vie for Henry’s attention, and even Edmund falls for Mary’s dazzling charms, only Fanny remains doubtful about the Crawfords’ influence and finds herself more isolated than ever. A subtle examination of social position and moral integrity, Mansfield Park is one of Jane Austen’s most profound works.

Continue reading

[Event] World Book Day 2015

Apparently, there’s this! It was celebrated on March 5 in the UK and Ireland. It’s marked to be celebrated on April 23 by UNESCO, I think. I’m a little confused by the dates. But either way, it’s better late (or early) than never, right? Any time is a good time to celebrate books and reading anyway. 🙂

So what is World Book Day? The website says:

World Book Day is a celebration! It’s a celebration of authors, illustrators, books and (most importantly) it’s a celebration of reading. In fact, it’s the biggest celebration of its kind, designated by UNESCO as a worldwide celebration of books and reading, and marked in over 100 countries all over the world . . .  It’s all about getting kids closer to the books and authors they already love, and letting them discover more books and authors they’ll love every bit as much in the future.

I love to read. I think books are awesome! And I think everybody should have the opportunity to read books and let their imagination run free.

———————————-

Interested in donating some books or sharing the love of reading? Check these out:

[Book Review] The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson

Title: The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson
Author: Mark Twain
Genre: Classics
Published: 1894
Source: Project Gutenberg and Librivox

WHAT’S THE BOOK ABOUT?

Here’s a description from Goodreads:

It begins with the act of a young slave girl exchanging her light-skinned child, fearing for its safety, for that of her master’s. From this reversal of identities evolves a suspenseful murder mystery and courtroom drama.

The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson is everything one would expect from a novel by Mark Twain. On the surface it is a witty and satirical tale but as one digs deeper a biting social commentary of racial inequality can be found.

Continue reading

[Book Review] The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays

The_Importance_of_being_Earnest_coverTitle: The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays
Author: Oscar Wilde
Genre: Classics, Satire
Published: 1985 by Signet Classics
Source: Purchased

WHAT’S THE BOOK ABOUT?

Here’s a description from Goodreads:

A universal favorite, The Importance of Being Earnest displays Oscar Wilde’s theatrical genius at its brilliant best. Subtitled “A Trivial Comedy for Serious People”, this hilarious attack on Victorian manners and morals turns a pompous world on its head, lets duplicity lead to happiness, and makes riposte the highest form of art. Also included in this special collection are Wilde’s first comedy success, Lady Windermere’s Fan, and his richly sensual melodrama, Salome.

Continue reading